Friday, October 11, 2019

Three Notable Figures in Librarianship in Jamaica

Daphne Rowena Douglas

Daphne Rowena Douglas (1924- ) was head of the University of the West Indies' Library Science Program 1976-1980, and again from 1982-1993. She received the Institute of Jamaica's Centenary Medal for Meritorious Service in the Field of Librarianship and Library in 1979. Ms. Douglas is a 1974 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh's library science program.

Sources: "Biographies of Jamaican Personalities: Daphne Douglas." National Library of Jamaica. National Library of Jamaica, n.d. Web. 11 Oct. 2010. ; "Professor Daphne Rowena Douglas." Douglas Archives. Douglas Archives, 26 Oct. 2010. Web. 8 Dec. 2010.

Kenneth Everard Niven Ingram

Kenneth Everard Niven Ingram (1921-2007) was one of  the earliest known black professional librarians in Jamaica. He was the University Librarian at the University College of the West Indies for ten years and helped found the Jamaica Library Association. Also, Mr. Ingram received the Gold Musgrave Medal for his contributions to library services and was president of the Association of Caribbean Universities, Research and Institutional Libraries. Mr. Ingram passed away in 2007.

Sources: "Biographies of Jamaican Personalities: Kenneth Everard Niven Ingram." National Library of Jamaica. National Library of Jamaica, n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2010. ; "Kenneth Everard Niven Ingram, OD, DLitt, MPhil, FLA, BA." University of the West Indies at Mona. University of the West Indies at Mona, n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2010. ; Dunn, Pat and Mordecai, Pamela. " Ingram, Kenneth Everard Niven." Encyclopedia of Latin and Caribbean Literature. Ed. Daniel Balderston and Mike Gonzalez. New York: Routledge, 2004. 276. Print.

Dorothy G. Williams Collings

Dorothy G. Williams Collings (1911-1991) helped found the library science program at the University of the West Indies. Ms. Collings, whose parents were Jamaican, was also a librarian at the New York Public Library and an instructor at the library school at Columbia University. She also worked at Atlanta University, UNESCO, and Fisk University. Ms. Collings received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1947.

Sources: Jackson, William Vernon. "The Pioneers: Dorothy G. Collings (1911-1991)." World Libraries 11.1-2 (2001):n.pag. Dominican Graduate School of Library and Information Science, 2001. Web. 8 Dec. 2010.; "Dorothy Collings: Tribute from the Library Association of Guyana." University of the West Indies at Mona, Library & Information Studies. University of the West Indies at Mona, n.d. Web. 8 Dec. 2010. ; Jordan, Casper Leroy. "Georgia Peaches and Cream: Afro-American Librarians in the State of Georgia."  Ed. Annette L. Phinazee. The Black Librarian in the Southeast: Reminiscences, Activities, Challenges. Durham: NCCU School of Library Service, 1980. 34 . Print. ; Cooper, Glendora Johnson. "African American Historical Continuity: Jean Blackwell Huston and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture." Reclaiming the American Library Past: Writing the Women In. Ed. Suzanne Hildenbrand. Norwood: Ablex, 1996. 38. Print.



Sunday, September 15, 2019

African and African American Presidents of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)

Robert Wedgeworth, IFLA President 1991-1997

Sources:"IFLA Presidents." IFLA.org. IFLA, 1 Apr. 2019. Web. 15 Sept. 2019.; Wilhite, Jeffrey M. 85 Years IFLA: A History and Chronology of Sessions 1927-2012. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2012.72, 77,269, 273, 283. Print. ; "Voice of 3,000 Librarian: Robert Wedgeworth, Executive Director of American Library Association Seeks to Make Librarians Visibile." Ebony 28.8 (1973): 107-108, 110-112. Print. ; "Arts and Letters." Ebony 28.3 (1973): 39. Print. ; Tate, Thelma H. "African Americans in International Librarianship." Handbook of Black Librarianship. Ed. E.J. Josey and Marva L. DeLoach. 2nd ed. Lanham: Scarecrow, 2000. 615, 618-619. Print. ; Dawson, Alma. "Celebrating African American Librarians and Librarianship." Library Trends 49.1 (2000): 61. Print. ; "Wedgeworth Named Dean of N.Y. Library School." Jet 68.21 (1985): 34. Print. ; "American Library Assn. Names Black Executive." Jet 42.4 (1972): 25. Print. ; "Lerome J. Bennett Unveils 'Wade in the Water' ." Jet 57.5 (1979): 55. Print. ; "People." Jet 22.25 (1962): 45. Print. ; "The Black Caucus of the American Library Association, Inc. Celebrates 40 Years." Black Caucus of the American Library Association, Inc. Newsletter 39.2 (2010): 4. Print.

Kay Raseroka, IFLA President 2003-2005

Sources: "IFLA Presidents." IFLA.org. IFLA, 1 Apr. 2019. Web. 15 Sept. 2019. ; Raseroka, Kay. "'Not in My Wildest Dreams': IFLA Journal Interviews Kay Raseroka." IFLA Journal 29.3 (2003): 205-208. PDF. ; Byrne, Alex. "Kay Raseroka, IFLA President 2003-2005." IFLA Journal 31.4 (2005): 355-356. PDF. ; Raseroka, Kay. "Reports to Council in Oslo: President's Report." IFLA Journal 31.4 (2005): 350-354. PDF. ; Wilhite, Jeffrey M. 85 Years IFLA: A History and Chronology of Sessions 1927-2012. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2012.78-79, 304, 307, 314. Print. ; Shimmon, Ross. Kay Raseroka Wins Presidential Election. The Hague, Netherlands: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, 2001.PDF. ; Raseroka, H. Kay. "Seizing the Moment: Issues and Opportunities towards the Creation of an Information Society." IFLA Journal 27.5-6 (2001): 322-327. PDF.

Ellen Tise, IFLA President 2009-2011

Sources: "IFLA Presidents." IFLA.org. IFLA, 1 Apr. 2019. Web. 15 Sept. 2019.; "Newsmaker: Ellen Tise." American Libraries 41.10 (Oct. 2010): 31. Print. ; "Gates Foundation Contributes $1.5 Million to IFLA Advocacy." American Libraries. ALA,  25 Aug. 2009. Web. 15 Sept. 2019; Carlton, Amy. "IFLA President's Program Reunites Leaders: Past Presidents Take to the Stage to Talk Change." American Libraries. ALA, 26 Aug. 2018. Web. 15 Sept. 2019; Tise, Ellen R. and Raju, Reggie. "African Librarianship: A Relic, a Fallacy, or an Imperative?" Library Trends 64.1 (2015):3-18. Print. ; Tise, Ellen R. "Strategies by LIASA to Develop Library Services and the Profession in Africa." Information Development 20.1 (2004): 36-42. PDF. ; "South Africa's Libraries Highlighted at LC Talk for African American Month." Capital Librarian 1.6-7 (Jan./Feb. 2008): 10. PDF. ; Tise, Ellen R. "Libraries Driving Access to Knowledge (A2K)." Libraries Driving Access to Knowledge. Ed. Jesus Lau, Anna Maria Tammaro, and Theo J. D. Bothma. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2012. 17-34.Print. ; Wilhite, Jeffrey M. 85 Years IFLA: A History and Chronology of Sessions 1927-2012. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2012.79-80, 88, 326, 330. Print.




Saturday, February 23, 2019

Some Early Librarians of Roosevelt High School, Gary, Indiana

Built in 1930, the Theodore Roosevelt High School of Gary, Indiana (now Theodore Roosevelt College and Career Academy) was established to educate the city's African American students. Some of the early librarians employed at the school: 

1931-1934 -- Wilhemina Turner was hired as a librarian at the Theodore Roosevelt High School where she worked until 1934. After receiving her library science degree in 1935, Turner became an assistant librarian at the Du Sable High School in Chicago, Illinois. 

1935-1936  -- Hortense Houston Young, was hired in 1935. A 1934 graduate of the University of Illinois Library School, Young remained at Roosevelt High School until 1936 when she became an assistant librarian at the Louisville Municipal College for Negroes (now Simmons College of Kentucky; Eliza Atkins Gleason and her sister, Ollie Atkins Carpenter once worked at the Louisville Municipal College for Negroes; Eliza became the first African American to earn a PhD in library science). 


1935-1937? -- Marjorie Adelle Blackistone Bradfield began working at Roosevelt High School (at that time she was Marjorie Blackistone). A native of Washington, D.C., Ms. Bradfield was the daughter of John Roger and Lucy Comfort Winston Blackistone. Bradfield was a 1935 graduate of the Columbia University School of Library Service (the school closed in 1992) and also attended the University of Michigan.  

In 1937, she became the first African American librarian hired by the Detroit Public Library in Detroit, Michigan. On June 29, 1938, she married Horace F. Bradfield.  Ms. Bradfield remained at the Detroit Public Library until 1968, when she left to accept a position as a school librarian for the Detroit Public Schools. 

In 1970, Ms. Bradfield was instrumental in the appointment of Clara Stanton Jones as the Detroit Public Library’s first African American female director (Ms. Jones would later serve as the first African American president of the American Library Association, 1976-1977). Also, in July 1970, Ms. Bradfield participated in a panel discussion, “Black History in Libraries”, given by the History Section of the American Library Association (now the Library History Round Table) at the 89th American Library Association Annual Conference held in Detroit.

Ms. Bradfield remained at the Detroit Public Schools until 1980. She passed away on November 19, 1999 at the age of 88.

Sources: A Directory of Negro Graduates of Accredited Library Schools, 1900-1936.  Washington: Columbia Civic Library Association, 1937. 7, 22, 25. Print. ; Jones, Reinette F. Library Service to African American in Kentucky: From the Reconstruction Era to the 1960s. Jefferson: McFarland, 2002. 91, 103, 126, 163. Print. ; Spradling, Mary Mace. “Black Librarians in Kentucky.” The Black Librarian in the Southeast: Reminiscences, Activities, Challenges. Ed. Annette L. Phinazee. Durham: NCCU School of Library Science, 1980. 50. Print. ; Audi, Tamara. "Marjorie Bradfield: Put Black History into Library." Detroit Free Press 20 Nov. 1999: 123. Print. ; "Marjorie A. Blackistone and Horace Ferguson Bradfield Papers: 1931-1978." Bentley Historical Library. University of Michigan. May 2017. Web. 23 Feb. 2019. ; Taliaferro, Trudy Bradfield. "Special Guest Column: Benjamin Brown, Buffalo Soldier, Family Hero." AAGSNC.org. African American Genealogical Society of Northern California. 2000. Web. 23 Feb. 2019.




Thursday, March 8, 2018

F. Blanche Foster (1918-1988): Librarian, Teacher, and Author

F. Blanche Foster (1918-1988), a writer of travel books for middle school students, served as a school librarian for South Vigo High School in Terre Haute, Indiana. A native of Tennessee, Ms. Foster was a graduate of Wiley High School in Terre Haute, Indiana (the school was merged with Honey Creek High School in the early 1970s to form South Vigo High School). She received her library science degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and was a school librarian in Detroit before returning to Terre Haute, Indiana.

On April 17, 1977, Ms. Foster, along with five other local authors, was honored by the Friends of the Indiana State University Cunningham Memorial Library at a reception held at Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana.

In 1979, Ms. Foster donated from her personal collection, four first edition volumes of the works of poet Paul Laurence Dunbar to the Vigo County Public Library.

She passed away in February 1988 at the age of 69 in Terre Haute, Indiana.

Her books:

Kenya. New York: Watts, 1969.

Dahomey. New York: F. Watts, 1971.

The West Indies: A Conceptual View. New York: Carlton, 1976.

East Central Africa: Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi. New York: Watts, 1981.

Sources: "F. Blanche Foster." Indiana Odyssey: Celebrating Local African American Authors. Vigo County Public Library, Feb. 2000. Web. 22 Sept. 2010. ; Davis, Bettie. "Terre Haute News." Indianapolis Recorder 3 Mar. 1979: 14. Print. ; Clark, Dorothy J. "Patrons Preview Set for YWCA Yule Bazaar." Terre Haute Tribune (Terre Haute, Ind.) 23 Nov. 1975: 65. Print. ; "Plan Reception to Honor Six Local Authors." Terre Haute Tribune (Terre Haute, Ind.) 7 Apr. 1977: 11. Print. ; "ISU to Fete Local Authors." Terre Haute Tribune (Terre Haute, Ind.) 16 Apr. 1977: 3. Print. ; "Local Authors Honored by Friends Group (Photo)". Terre Haute Tribune (Terre Haute, Ind.) 20 Apr. 1977: 12. Print. ; "Carole Jones Memorial Speaker." Terre Haute Tribune (Terre Haute, Ind.) 21 Apr. 1977: 9. Print. ; "An Afternoon of Black Art (Photo)." Indianapolis Recorder 12 Oct. 1974: 4. Print. ; "Newlyweds at the Webbs." Indianapolis Recorder 6 Oct. 1979: 7. Print. ; Davis, Bettie. "Terre Haute News." Indianapolis Recorder 3 Mar. 1979: 14. Print. ; "Indiana Black Assembly Endorses Hatcher Plan to Form New Group." Indianapolis Recorder 16 Aug. 1975: 1, 13. Print. ; "Deaths."  Indianapolis Star 16 Feb. 1988: 32. Print.


Friday, March 24, 2017

Dr. Daniel Thomas Williams (1932-2010): University Archivist for Tuskegee University

Dr. Daniel Thomas Williams (1932-2010), was the University Archivist at Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee University) in Tuskegee, Alabama from 1968-1999. A native of Miami, Florida, Dr. Williams was the son of Willie Mae and Daniel T. Williams, Sr.

Dr. Williams completed his undergraduate education in 1956 at West Virginia State College (now West Virginia State University) in Institute, West Virginia. In 1957, Dr. Williams received his M.L.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and was hired the same year by Tuskegee where he worked first as a serials librarian, then as director of the university's professional libraries, and finally, in 1968 as the university's archivist. In 1969,  Dr. Williams received a certificate in archival administration from American University.

Dr. Williams was part of the U.S. Delegation of the World Congress on Archives which met in Moscow, Russia in 1972. Dr. Williams further his education at Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama where he earned his PhD. in Education in 1987.

In 1989, Dr. Williams was honored by the Academy of Certified Archivists and named a fellow by the Society of American Archivists in 1992. He was also the curator for Tuskegee's Daniel James Memorial Hall.

In 1994 and again in 1997, Dr. Williams discussed Tuskegee University's history on C-SPAN2. Video recordings of both sessions are available at:

Dan Williams, Archivist, Tuskegee University
https://www.c-span.org/person/?danwilliams

Dr. Williams remained at Tuskegee University until his retirement in 1999. He passed away on June 24, 2010 in Hollywood, Florida.



Sources: Shockley, Ann Allen. "Librarians, Archivists, and Writers: A Personal Perspective." The Black Librarian in America Revisited. Ed. E.J. Josey. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1994. 320, 322. Print. ; "Former TU Archivist Dr. Daniel Williams Dies." The Tuskegee News (Online Edition) 8 July 2010. Web. 27 Feb. 2011. ; The Black Librarian in the Southeast: Reminiscences, Activities, Challenges. Ed. Annette L. Phinazee. Durham: NCCU School of Library of Science, 1980. 24, 29, 192-193. Print. ; Fields, Dorothy Jenkins. "Remembering Two Colleagues Who Made History." Miami Herald 24 Feb. 2011. Web, 27 Feb 2011. ; "Dan Williams - SAA Fellow." African-American and Third World Archivists Roundtable Newsletter 6.2 (1992): 1, 4. Print. ; "Another Honor for the Peanut Man: Botanist George Washington Carver Named to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans." Ebony 32.9 (1977): 103. Print. ; "People." Jet 83.2 (1992): 20. Print.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Andrew Venable, Jr. (1944-2016): First African American Director of the Cleveland Public Library

Andrew Venable, Jr., a native of Staunton, Virginia, was the first African American director of the Cleveland Public Library in Cleveland, Ohio. He was born on November 11, 1944 to Andrew and Catherine Venable. Andrew Venable, Jr. was a graduate of Booker T. Washington High School (now Booker T. Washington Community Center) in Staunton, Virginia; a graduate of Virginia State University (formerly Virginia State College) in Petersburg, Virginia; and a graduate of the Case Western Reserve University School of Library Science (Note: In 1981 the library school's name was changed to the Matthew A. Baxter School of Information and Library Science; the library science program was in operation from 1903 until 1986).

Mr. Venable began his library career at the Cleveland Public Library in Cleveland, Ohio in 1970. He remained there for 13 years. In 1983, Mr. Venable left the Cleveland Public Library to become the director of the East Cleveland Public Library. He served there for five years. After leaving the East Cleveland Public Library, Mr. Venable served as the director of the Gary Public Library in Gary, Indiana from 1988 until 1992. After his tenure at the Gary Public Library, Mr. Venable became library director at the Ivy Tech Community College-Northwest Region (the college is also known as Ivy Tech). He served there from 1992 until 1993.

In 1993, Mr. Venable left Indiana and headed east to Washington, D.C. where he held the position of Deputy Director at the D.C. Public Library. Four years later, Mr. Venable returned to the place where he began his library career -- The Cleveland Public Library. He served as deputy director (1997-1999) and then director (1999-2008). He retired in 2008.

Andrew Venable, Jr. passed away on May 5, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Highlights of Andrew Venable Jr.'s Career:

First African American director of the Cleveland Public Library

Named Librarian of the Year by the Ohio Library Council in 2001

Instrumental in the creation of the Greater Access Library Card

Awarded the Key to the City of Cleveland in 2008

Credited with describing public libraries as "The Peoples' University"

Awarded an honorary doctorate from Cleveland State University in 2007

A member of the fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha


Sources: Oder, Norman. "Q & A with Cleveland's Andrew Venable." Libraryjournal.com. Library Journal. 15 May 2008. Web. 10 Dec. 2010. ; "Andrew Venable Appointed Director of CPL." PR Newswire.com. PR Newswire, 9 June 1999. Web. 20 Dec. 2010. ; Henson, Jane E. E. Libraries--Link to Learning. Final Report on the Indiana Governor's Conference on Libraries and Information Services (2nd, Indianapolis, Indiana, November 16-18, 1990). Indianapolis: State of Indiana, 1990. Print. ; Hanson, Debbie. "Andrew Venable: Leading the Peoples' University." ClevelandSeniors.com, N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2010. ; "Reading Recruiter Gary Library Chief Hustles to Bring in Customers." Post-Tribune (Ind.) 18 Feb. 1990. Highbeam Research. Web. 10 Dec. 2010. ; "City of Gary Says Farewell as Old Friend Tries Something New." Post-Tribune (Ind.) 6 Oct. 1993. Highbeam Research. Web. 2 Feb. 2011. ; "Venable Named Director of Cleveland Public Library." American Libraries. American Library Association, 14 June 1999. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. "Andrew Venable (1944-2016), Cleveland Library Director." Cleveland Public Library Archives. 9 May 2016. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Kuehner, John C. "Andrew A. Venable Jr. Cleveland Public Library Leader Who Coined the Term 'The Peoples University': Black History Month." The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio) 13 Feb. 2013. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Cleveland Public Library." Encyclopedia of Cleveland History. Case Western Reserve University. 23 Sept. 2004. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Marco, Guy A. "Cleveland Public Library." The American Public Library Handbook. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, 2012. 94. Print. ; "The Schools of CRWU." University Archives. Case Western Reserve University. 2009. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Mr. Andrew Venable, Jr. (Obituary)." efboyd.com. E.F. Boyd & Son Funeral Home and Crematory. 2016. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Cleveland Public Library to Open Circulating eBook Collection." Independent Publisher (Online). Jenkins Publishing Group, n.d. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Rogers, Michael, and Norman Oder. "Venable Named Cleveland Director." Library Journal 124.12 (Jul. 1999): 18. Print. ; Gray, Lisa. "Balancing the Books: Budget Cuts Strike Deep at the D.C. Public Library." Washington City Paper (Washington, D.C.) 17 Feb . 1995. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Carnegie's Commemorative Grants to Urban Public Libraries." Carnegie.org. Carnegie Corporation of New York, 10 June 1999. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Albanese, Andrew Richard. "Culture Keepers: ALA's Black Caucus Continues to Make a Critical Difference in Library Services."  Libraryjournal.com. Library Journal. 15 Sept. 2002. Web. 8 Jan. 2017.



Friday, September 16, 2016

Dr. Carla D. Hayden: The First African American Librarian of Congress

A remarkable moment in library history!!

On Wednesday, September 14, 2016, Dr. Carla D. Hayden was sworn in as the 14th Librarian of Congress by Supreme Court Justice John Roberts, Jr.  The ceremony was broadcast live on the Library of Congress's YouTube channel.


Members of the United States Congress who spoke during the ceremony included Representative Paul Ryan (Speaker of the House), Senator Roy D. Blunt (Chairman of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration), and Senator Barbara A. Mikulski.


Some facts about Dr. Hayden:


The first African American to serve as the Librarian of Congress.

The first woman to serve as the Librarian of Congress.

Nominated for the position of Librarian of Congress by President Barack Obama, the first African American President of the United States.

President of the American Library Association, 2003-2004.

Served as director of the Enoch Pratt Library in Baltimore, Maryland from 1993-2016.

Received her library science education at the University of Chicago Graduate Library School.

Worked at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago and at the Chicago Public Library in the 1970s and 1980s.

Taught library science at the University of Pittsburgh.

Library Journal's Librarian of the Year in 1995.

In 1992, Dr. Hayden edited Ventures into Cultures: A Resource Book of Multicultural Materials and Programs

Timeline of Dr. Hayden's journey to the Library of Congress:

February 24, 2016  --  Dr. Hayden Nominated by President Barack Obama

April 20, 2016  --  Confirmation Hearing Held for Dr. Hayden

July 13, 2016 -- Dr. Hayden Confirmed 

September 14, 2016 -- Dr. Hayden sworn in as Librarian of Congress

Transcripts of Dr. Hayden's confirmation hearing and swearing-in ceremony:


The transcript of the confirmation hearing (click on the title below): 

United States Congress. Senate. Committee on Rules and Administration. Nomination of Dr. Carla D. Hayden, to Be Librarian of Congress: Hearing Before the Committee on Rules and Administration, Congress of the United States, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, Second Session, April 20, 2016. Washington : G.P.O., 2016. PDF File.


The transcript of Dr. Hayden's remarks from the swearing-in ceremony can be accessed by clicking here: 

Remarks by Carla Hayden, 14th Librarian of Congress: Swearing-In Ceremony, September 14, 2016. [Washington, D.C.] : Library of Congress, 2016. PDF.

Black Caucus of the American Library Association Newsletter:

The Summer 2016 issue of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association Newsletter features Dr. Hayden on the cover as well as some pieces written about her (see pages 42-48):

http://bcala.org/Summer2016/BCALA_Summer2016.html

Update 10/04/2016: 

The October 2016 issue of Essence features a brief paragraph on Dr. Hayden:

"History Maker." Essence 47.6 (Oct. 2016): 86. Print.

Also, the September/October 2016 issue of Library of Congress Magazine features an interview of Dr. Hayden in which she discusses what she hopes to accomplish as the new Librarian of Congress:

"The 14th Librarian of Congress." Library of Congress Magazine 5.5 (Sept./Oct. 2016): 2-3. PDF File.

Update 10/08/2016:

On September 19, 2016, Dr. Hayden was interviewed by Jeffrey Brown on PBS Newshour:

"The New Librarian of Congress on the Value of Free Information"
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/new-librarian-congress-value-free-information/

Update 10/25/2016:

The October 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal features an article about Dr. Hayden:

Schwartz, Meredith. "Librarian of the People: The New Librarian of Congress Sets an Ambitious Agenda and a New Tone." Library Journal 141.17 (Oct. 2016): 20-22. Print.

Update 10/31/2016:

The Nov./Dec. 2016 issue of American Libraries features an article about Dr. Hayden:

Landgraf, Greg. "America's Librarian: Carla Hayden Plans to Continue Her Career-Long Focus on Access and Technology as Librarian of Congress." American Libraries 47.11/12 (Nov./Dec. 2016): 40-44. Print.

Update 11/03/2016:

Related articles:

Page, Susan. "Carla Hayden Becomes First Woman, First Black to Lead Library of Congress." USA Today 14 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016.

Woods, Baynard. "Carla Hayden: New Librarian of Congress Makes History, with an Eye on the Future." The Guardian 15 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016.

Darnton, Robert. "The New Hillary Library?" The New York Review of Books 27 Oct. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016. 

McGlone, Peggy. "'Rock Star' Baltimore Librarian Makes History at Library of Congress." Washington Post 14 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016.

Update 11/14/2016:

Dr. Hayden is featured on a Library of Congress webcast reading to children at the Library of Congress Young Readers Center:

http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7464

Update 12/05/2016:

A photograph of Dr. Hayden being sworn in as the Librarian of Congress is on page 24 of the November/December 2016 issue of Library of Congress Magazine:

"Around the Library." Library of Congress Magazine 5.6 (Nov./Dec. 2016): 24. PDF File.

Update 1/14/2017:

A photograph of Dr. Hayden and singer Smokey Robinson is on page 24 of the January/February 2017 issue of Library of Congress Magazine:

"Around the Library." Library of Congress Magazine 6.1 (Jan./Feb. 2017): 24. PDF File.

Dr. Hayden was also interviewed by Shannon Maughan for Publishers Weekly:

Maughan, Shannon. "PW Talks with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden." Publishers Weekly 16 Dec. 2016. Web. 14 Jan. 2017.

Update 2/01/2017:

Cox, Ana Marie. "Carla Hayden Thinks Libraries Are a Key to Freedom." New York Times Magazine 22 Jan. 2017: MM66. Print.

Update 2/04/2017:


Daliyah Marie Arana, a four-year-old from Georgia, visited with Dr. Hayden at the Library of Congress and served as its first "Librarian for the Day":

https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/2017/01/17/newsmaker-daliyah-marie-arana/

Update 2/16/2017:

Dr. Hayden was interviewed by Lottie L. Joiner for the Fall 2016 issue of Crisis:

Joiner, Lottie L. "The Accidental Librarian: Carla Hayden is the First Woman and First African American to Head the Library of Congress." Crisis 123.4 (Fall 2016): 22-25. Print.

Note: Crisis is the journal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and was founded by W.E.B. DuBois in 1910.

Update 2/26/2017:

Dr. Hayden was interviewed by Sarah Larson for the New Yorker:

Larson, Sarah. "The Librarian Congress and the Greatness of Humility: The Values of Dr. Carla Hayden, the First Woman and the First of Color in the Position, Can Be Seen in Every Aspect of the Institution She Runs." The New Yorker 19 Feb. 2017. Web. 23 Feb. 2017.

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/sarah-larson/the-librarian-of-congress-and-the-greatness-of-humility


Update 03/26/2017:

Dr. Hayden will be a part of the 20th Anniversary Celebration of the Spectrum Scholarship Program: 

"Dr. Carla Hayden to Kick Off Spectrum 20th Anniversary Celebration at ALA Annual Conference." ALA News 20 Mar. 2017. Web. 26 Mar. 2017.

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2017/03/dr-carla-hayden-kick-spectrum-20th-anniversary-celebration-ala-annual



Sources: Pelosi, Nancy. Acceptance letter for the United for Libraries Award and an endorsement of Carla Hayden for Librarian of Congress. 2016 May 2. Letter. ; Fandos, Nicholas and Michael Shear. “Privacy Advocate is Choice to Head the Librarian of Congress.” New York Times (New York ed.). 25 Feb. 2016: A12. Print. ; Fandos, Nicholas. “Library of Congress Nominee Gets Senate Hearing.” New York Times (New York ed.). 21 Apr. 2016: A18. Print. ; Campbell, Colin. “Hayden Glides through Senate Confirmation Hearing to Lead Library of Congress.” Baltimore Sun 20 Apr. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; McGlone, Peggy. “Librarian of Congress Nominee Carla D. Hayden to Testify before Senate.” Washington Post 20 Apr. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Duner, Alex. “Can Carla Hayden Reinvent the Library of Congress?” U.S News & World Report 25 Mar. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Peet, Lisa. “President Obama Announces Intent to Nominate Carla D. Hayden as Librarian of Congress.” Library Journal 26 Feb. 2016. 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