Friday, March 24, 2017

Dr. Daniel Thomas Williams (1932-2010): University Archivist for Tuskegee University

Dr. Daniel Thomas Williams (1932-2010), was the University Archivist at Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee University) in Tuskegee, Alabama from 1968-1999. A native of Miami, Florida, Dr. Williams was the son of Willie Mae and Daniel T. Williams, Sr.

Dr. Williams completed his undergraduate education in 1956 at West Virginia State College (now West Virginia State University) in Institute, West Virginia. In 1957, Dr. Williams received his M.L.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and was hired the same year by Tuskegee where he worked first as a serials librarian, then as director of the university's professional libraries, and finally, in 1968 as the university's archivist. In 1969,  Dr. Williams received a certificate in archival administration from American University.

Dr. Williams was part of the U.S. Delegation of the World Congress on Archives which met in Moscow, Russia in 1972. Dr. Williams further his education at Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama where he earned his PhD. in Education in 1987.

In 1989, Dr. Williams was honored by the Academy of Certified Archivists and named a fellow by the Society of American Archivists in 1992. He was also the curator for Tuskegee's Daniel James Memorial Hall.

In 1994 and again in 1997, Dr. Williams discussed Tuskegee University's history on C-SPAN2. Video recordings of both sessions are available at:

Dan Williams, Archivist, Tuskegee University
https://www.c-span.org/person/?danwilliams

Dr. Williams remained at Tuskegee University until his retirement in 1999. He passed away on June 24, 2010 in Hollywood, Florida.



Sources: Shockley, Ann Allen. "Librarians, Archivists, and Writers: A Personal Perspective." The Black Librarian in America Revisited. Ed. E.J. Josey. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1994. 320, 322. Print. ; "Former TU Archivist Dr. Daniel Williams Dies." The Tuskegee News (Online Edition) 8 July 2010. Web. 27 Feb. 2011. ; The Black Librarian in the Southeast: Reminiscences, Activities, Challenges. Ed. Annette L. Phinazee. Durham: NCCU School of Library of Science, 1980. 24, 29, 192-193. Print. ; Fields, Dorothy Jenkins. "Remembering Two Colleagues Who Made History." Miami Herald 24 Feb. 2011. Web, 27 Feb 2011. ; "Dan Williams - SAA Fellow." African-American and Third World Archivists Roundtable Newsletter 6.2 (1992): 1, 4. Print. ; "Another Honor for the Peanut Man: Botanist George Washington Carver Named to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans." Ebony 32.9 (1977): 103. Print. ; "People." Jet 83.2 (1992): 20. Print.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Andrew Venable, Jr. (1944-2016): First African American Director of the Cleveland Public Library

Andrew Venable, Jr., a native of Staunton, Virginia, was the first African American director of the Cleveland Public Library in Cleveland, Ohio. He was born on November 11, 1944 to Andrew and Catherine Venable. Andrew Venable, Jr. was a graduate of Booker T. Washington High School (now Booker T. Washington Community Center) in Staunton, Virginia; a graduate of Virginia State University (formerly Virginia State College) in Petersburg, Virginia; and a graduate of the Case Western Reserve University School of Library Science (Note: In 1981 the library school's name was changed to the Matthew A. Baxter School of Information and Library Science; the library science program was in operation from 1903 until 1986).

Mr. Venable began his library career at the Cleveland Public Library in Cleveland, Ohio in 1970. He remained there for 13 years. In 1983, Mr. Venable left the Cleveland Public Library to become the director of the East Cleveland Public Library. He served there for five years. After leaving the East Cleveland Public Library, Mr. Venable served as the director of the Gary Public Library in Gary, Indiana from 1988 until 1992. After his tenure at the Gary Public Library, Mr. Venable became library director at the Ivy Tech Community College-Northwest Region (the college is also known as Ivy Tech). He served there from 1992 until 1993.

In 1993, Mr. Venable left Indiana and headed east to Washington, D.C. where he held the position of Deputy Director at the D.C. Public Library. Four years later, Mr. Venable returned to the place where he began his library career -- The Cleveland Public Library. He served as deputy director (1997-1999) and then director (1999-2008). He retired in 2008.

Andrew Venable, Jr. passed away on May 5, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Highlights of Andrew Venable Jr.'s Career:

First African American director of the Cleveland Public Library

Named Librarian of the Year by the Ohio Library Council in 2001

Instrumental in the creation of the Greater Access Library Card

Awarded the Key to the City of Cleveland in 2008

Credited with describing public libraries as "The Peoples' University"

Awarded an honorary doctorate from Cleveland State University in 2007

A member of the fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha


Sources: Oder, Norman. "Q & A with Cleveland's Andrew Venable." Libraryjournal.com. Library Journal. 15 May 2008. Web. 10 Dec. 2010. ; "Andrew Venable Appointed Director of CPL." PR Newswire.com. PR Newswire, 9 June 1999. Web. 20 Dec. 2010. ; Henson, Jane E. E. Libraries--Link to Learning. Final Report on the Indiana Governor's Conference on Libraries and Information Services (2nd, Indianapolis, Indiana, November 16-18, 1990). Indianapolis: State of Indiana, 1990. Print. ; Hanson, Debbie. "Andrew Venable: Leading the Peoples' University." ClevelandSeniors.com, N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2010. ; "Reading Recruiter Gary Library Chief Hustles to Bring in Customers." Post-Tribune (Ind.) 18 Feb. 1990. Highbeam Research. Web. 10 Dec. 2010. ; "City of Gary Says Farewell as Old Friend Tries Something New." Post-Tribune (Ind.) 6 Oct. 1993. Highbeam Research. Web. 2 Feb. 2011. ; "Venable Named Director of Cleveland Public Library." American Libraries. American Library Association, 14 June 1999. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. "Andrew Venable (1944-2016), Cleveland Library Director." Cleveland Public Library Archives. 9 May 2016. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Kuehner, John C. "Andrew A. Venable Jr. Cleveland Public Library Leader Who Coined the Term 'The Peoples University': Black History Month." The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio) 13 Feb. 2013. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Cleveland Public Library." Encyclopedia of Cleveland History. Case Western Reserve University. 23 Sept. 2004. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Marco, Guy A. "Cleveland Public Library." The American Public Library Handbook. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, 2012. 94. Print. ; "The Schools of CRWU." University Archives. Case Western Reserve University. 2009. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Mr. Andrew Venable, Jr. (Obituary)." efboyd.com. E.F. Boyd & Son Funeral Home and Crematory. 2016. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Cleveland Public Library to Open Circulating eBook Collection." Independent Publisher (Online). Jenkins Publishing Group, n.d. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Rogers, Michael, and Norman Oder. "Venable Named Cleveland Director." Library Journal 124.12 (Jul. 1999): 18. Print. ; Gray, Lisa. "Balancing the Books: Budget Cuts Strike Deep at the D.C. Public Library." Washington City Paper (Washington, D.C.) 17 Feb . 1995. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; "Carnegie's Commemorative Grants to Urban Public Libraries." Carnegie.org. Carnegie Corporation of New York, 10 June 1999. Web. 8 Jan. 2017. ; Albanese, Andrew Richard. "Culture Keepers: ALA's Black Caucus Continues to Make a Critical Difference in Library Services."  Libraryjournal.com. Library Journal. 15 Sept. 2002. Web. 8 Jan. 2017.



Friday, September 16, 2016

Dr. Carla D. Hayden: The First African American Librarian of Congress

A remarkable moment in library history!!

On Wednesday, September 14, 2016, Dr. Carla D. Hayden was sworn in as the 14th Librarian of Congress by Supreme Court Justice John Roberts, Jr.  The ceremony was broadcast live on the Library of Congress's YouTube channel.


Members of the United States Congress who spoke during the ceremony included Representative Paul Ryan (Speaker of the House), Senator Roy D. Blunt (Chairman of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration), and Senator Barbara A. Mikulski.


Some facts about Dr. Hayden:


The first African American to serve as the Librarian of Congress.

The first woman to serve as the Librarian of Congress.

Nominated for the position of Librarian of Congress by President Barack Obama, the first African American President of the United States.

President of the American Library Association, 2003-2004.

Served as director of the Enoch Pratt Library in Baltimore, Maryland from 1993-2016.

Received her library science education at the University of Chicago Graduate Library School.

Worked at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago and at the Chicago Public Library in the 1970s and 1980s.

Taught library science at the University of Pittsburgh.

Library Journal's Librarian of the Year in 1995.

In 1992, Dr. Hayden edited Ventures into Cultures: A Resource Book of Multicultural Materials and Programs

Timeline of Dr. Hayden's journey to the Library of Congress:

February 24, 2016  --  Dr. Hayden Nominated by President Barack Obama

April 20, 2016  --  Confirmation Hearing Held for Dr. Hayden

July 13, 2016 -- Dr. Hayden Confirmed 

September 14, 2016 -- Dr. Hayden sworn in as Librarian of Congress

Transcripts of Dr. Hayden's confirmation hearing and swearing-in ceremony:


The transcript of the confirmation hearing (click on the title below): 

United States Congress. Senate. Committee on Rules and Administration. Nomination of Dr. Carla D. Hayden, to Be Librarian of Congress: Hearing Before the Committee on Rules and Administration, Congress of the United States, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, Second Session, April 20, 2016. Washington : G.P.O., 2016. PDF File.


The transcript of Dr. Hayden's remarks from the swearing-in ceremony can be accessed by clicking here: 

Remarks by Carla Hayden, 14th Librarian of Congress: Swearing-In Ceremony, September 14, 2016. [Washington, D.C.] : Library of Congress, 2016. PDF.

Black Caucus of the American Library Association Newsletter:

The Summer 2016 issue of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association Newsletter features Dr. Hayden on the cover as well as some pieces written about her (see pages 42-48):

http://bcala.org/Summer2016/BCALA_Summer2016.html

Update 10/04/2016: 

The October 2016 issue of Essence features a brief paragraph on Dr. Hayden:

"History Maker." Essence 47.6 (Oct. 2016): 86. Print.

Also, the September/October 2016 issue of Library of Congress Magazine features an interview of Dr. Hayden in which she discusses what she hopes to accomplish as the new Librarian of Congress:

"The 14th Librarian of Congress." Library of Congress Magazine 5.5 (Sept./Oct. 2016): 2-3. PDF File.

Update 10/08/2016:

On September 19, 2016, Dr. Hayden was interviewed by Jeffrey Brown on PBS Newshour:

"The New Librarian of Congress on the Value of Free Information"
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/new-librarian-congress-value-free-information/

Update 10/25/2016:

The October 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal features an article about Dr. Hayden:

Schwartz, Meredith. "Librarian of the People: The New Librarian of Congress Sets an Ambitious Agenda and a New Tone." Library Journal 141.17 (Oct. 2016): 20-22. Print.

Update 10/31/2016:

The Nov./Dec. 2016 issue of American Libraries features an article about Dr. Hayden:

Landgraf, Greg. "America's Librarian: Carla Hayden Plans to Continue Her Career-Long Focus on Access and Technology as Librarian of Congress." American Libraries 47.11/12 (Nov./Dec. 2016): 40-44. Print.

Update 11/03/2016:

Related articles:

Page, Susan. "Carla Hayden Becomes First Woman, First Black to Lead Library of Congress." USA Today 14 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016.

Woods, Baynard. "Carla Hayden: New Librarian of Congress Makes History, with an Eye on the Future." The Guardian 15 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016.

Darnton, Robert. "The New Hillary Library?" The New York Review of Books 27 Oct. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016. 

McGlone, Peggy. "'Rock Star' Baltimore Librarian Makes History at Library of Congress." Washington Post 14 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016.

Update 11/14/2016:

Dr. Hayden is featured on a Library of Congress webcast reading to children at the Library of Congress Young Readers Center:

http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7464

Update 12/05/2016:

A photograph of Dr. Hayden being sworn in as the Librarian of Congress is on page 24 of the November/December 2016 issue of Library of Congress Magazine:

"Around the Library." Library of Congress Magazine 5.6 (Nov./Dec. 2016): 24. PDF File.

Update 1/14/2017:

A photograph of Dr. Hayden and singer Smokey Robinson is on page 24 of the January/February 2017 issue of Library of Congress Magazine:

"Around the Library." Library of Congress Magazine 6.1 (Jan./Feb. 2017): 24. PDF File.

Dr. Hayden was also interviewed by Shannon Maughan for Publishers Weekly:

Maughan, Shannon. "PW Talks with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden." Publishers Weekly 16 Dec. 2016. Web. 14 Jan. 2017.

Update 2/01/2017:

Cox, Ana Marie. "Carla Hayden Thinks Libraries Are a Key to Freedom." New York Times Magazine 22 Jan. 2017: MM66. Print.

Update 2/04/2017:


Daliyah Marie Arana, a four-year-old from Georgia, visited with Dr. Hayden at the Library of Congress and served as its first "Librarian for the Day":

https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/2017/01/17/newsmaker-daliyah-marie-arana/

Update 2/16/2017:

Dr. Hayden was interviewed by Lottie L. Joiner for the Fall 2016 issue of Crisis:

Joiner, Lottie L. "The Accidental Librarian: Carla Hayden is the First Woman and First African American to Head the Library of Congress." Crisis 123.4 (Fall 2016): 22-25. Print.

Note: Crisis is the journal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and was founded by W.E.B. DuBois in 1910.

Update 2/26/2017:

Dr. Hayden was interviewed by Sarah Larson for the New Yorker:

Larson, Sarah. "The Librarian Congress and the Greatness of Humility: The Values of Dr. Carla Hayden, the First Woman and the First of Color in the Position, Can Be Seen in Every Aspect of the Institution She Runs." The New Yorker 19 Feb. 2017. Web. 23 Feb. 2017.

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/sarah-larson/the-librarian-of-congress-and-the-greatness-of-humility


Update 03/26/2017:

Dr. Hayden will be a part of the 20th Anniversary Celebration of the Spectrum Scholarship Program: 

"Dr. Carla Hayden to Kick Off Spectrum 20th Anniversary Celebration at ALA Annual Conference." ALA News 20 Mar. 2017. Web. 26 Mar. 2017.

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2017/03/dr-carla-hayden-kick-spectrum-20th-anniversary-celebration-ala-annual



Sources: Pelosi, Nancy. Acceptance letter for the United for Libraries Award and an endorsement of Carla Hayden for Librarian of Congress. 2016 May 2. Letter. ; Fandos, Nicholas and Michael Shear. “Privacy Advocate is Choice to Head the Librarian of Congress.” New York Times (New York ed.). 25 Feb. 2016: A12. Print. ; Fandos, Nicholas. “Library of Congress Nominee Gets Senate Hearing.” New York Times (New York ed.). 21 Apr. 2016: A18. Print. ; Campbell, Colin. “Hayden Glides through Senate Confirmation Hearing to Lead Library of Congress.” Baltimore Sun 20 Apr. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; McGlone, Peggy. “Librarian of Congress Nominee Carla D. Hayden to Testify before Senate.” Washington Post 20 Apr. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Duner, Alex. “Can Carla Hayden Reinvent the Library of Congress?” U.S News & World Report 25 Mar. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Peet, Lisa. “President Obama Announces Intent to Nominate Carla D. Hayden as Librarian of Congress.” Library Journal 26 Feb. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Gravatt, Nancy. “‘The President Could Not Have Made a Better Choice’”: ALA Comments on the Pending Nomination of Dr. Carla Hayden for Librarian of Congress.” ALA News 24 Feb. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Clark, Larra. “ALA Past President Receives Warm Senate Welcome.” ALA Dispatch 20 Apr. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Price, Gary. “Librarian of Congress: Carla Hayden’s Senate Confirmation Hearing Scheduled for Next Week.” INFOdocket 14 Apr. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Trujillo, Mario. “Obama Nominates First Black, Female Librarian of Congress.” The Hill 24 Feb. 2016. Web. 12 May 2016. ; Kenney, Brian. “The Case for Carla Hayden: An Experienced Library Leader is Exactly What the Library of Congress Needs.” Publishers Weekly 263.20 (May 16, 2016): 16-17. Print. ; Connley, Courtney. “President Obama Nominates First African American to Head Library of Congress.” Black Enterprise 25 Feb. 2016. Web. 28 May 2016. ; Carla Hayden First African American to Be Nominated to Head U.S. Library of Congress.” Caribbean Current 25 Feb. 2016. Web. 28 May 2016 ; Peet, Lisa. "Carla D. Hayden Confirmed as 14th Librarian of Congress by Wide Margin." Library Journal 13 July 2016. Web. 15 Sept. 2016 ; Peet, Lisa. "Carla Hayden Blazes Trail as First Woman, First African American Librarian of Congress." Library Journal 15 Sept. 2016. Web. 15 Sept. 2016. ; "Save the Date: Library Career Expo Coming March 6th." The Wednesday Word: News from the Indiana State Library 13 Jan. 2010. Web. 15 Sept. 2016. ; "Registration Closes Tomorrow for Library Career Expo." The Wednesday Word: News from the Indiana State Library 3 Mar. 2010. Web. 15 Sept. 2016. ; "Carla Hayden Elected New American Library Association President." Jet 101.23 (2002): 34-35. Print. ; Fandos, Nicholas. "New Librarian of Congress Offers History Lesson in Her Own Right." New York Times 15 Sept. 2016: A13. Print. ; "President Obama Announces His Intent to Nominate Carla D. Hayden as Librarian of Congress." Whitehouse.gov, 24 Feb. 2016. Web. 3 Oct. 2016. ; Ventures into Cultures: A Resource Book of Multicultural Materials and Programs. Ed. Carla D. Hayden. Chicago: American Library Association, 1992. Print. ; United States Congress. Senate. Committee on Rules and Administration. Nomination of Dr. Carla D. Hayden, to Be Librarian of Congress: Hearing Before the Committee on Rules and Administration, Congress of the United States, One Hundred Fourteenth Congress, Second Session, April 20, 2016. Washington : G.P.O., 2016. Print. ; Remarks by Carla Hayden, 14th Librarian of Congress: Swearing-In Ceremony, September 14, 2016. [Washington, D.C] : Library of Congress, 2016. PDF. ; "History Maker." Essence 47.6 (Oct. 2016): 86. Print. ;  "The 14th Librarian of Congress." Library of Congress Magazine 5.5 (Sept./Oct. 2016): 2-3. PDF File. ; Schwartz, Meredith. "Librarian of the People: The New Librarian of Congress Sets an Ambitious Agenda and a New Tone." Library Journal 141.17 (Oct. 2016): 20-22. Print. ; Landgraf, Greg. "America's Librarian: Carla Hayden Plans to Continue Her Career-Long Focus on Access and Technology as Librarian of Congress." American Libraries 47.11/12 (Nov./Dec. 2016): 40-44. Print. ; Darnton, Robert. "The New Hillary Library?" The New York Review of Books 27 Oct. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016. ; Page, Susan. "Carla Hayden Becomes First Woman, First Black to Lead Library of Congress." USA Today 14 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016. ; McGlone, Peggy. "'Rock Star' Baltimore Librarian Makes History at Library of Congress." Washington Post 14 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016. ; Woods, Baynard. "Carla Hayden: New Librarian of Congress Makes History, with an Eye on the Future." The Guardian 15 Sept. 2016. Web. 3 Nov. 2016. ; Vercelletto, Christina. "Up Front: The Power of Purpose: SLJ Summit Attendees Got a Fresh Perspective, New Energy, and Actionable Ideas." School Library Journal 69.11 (Nov. 2016): 12-14. Print. Staino, Rocco. "Carla Hayden Headlines the 2016 National Book Festival." School Library Journal 3 Oct. 2016. Web. 14 Nov. 2016. ; Peet, Lisa. "Hayden, Marx in Conversation at NYPL." Library Journal 8 Nov. 2016. Web. 14 Nov. 2016. ; Davenport, Anne Azzi. "The New Librarian-in-Chief Picks Her Favorite Children's Book." PBS NewsHour: Art Beat 20 Sept. 2016. Web. 14 Nov. 2016. ; Gross, Daniel A. "Carla Hayden Takes Charge of the World's Largest Library." The New Yorker 20 Sept. 2016. Web. 14 Nov. 2016. ; Begley, Sarah. "10 Questions with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden." Time 15 Sept. 2016. Web. 14 Nov. 2016. ; "Around the Library." Library of Congress Magazine 5.6 (Nov./Dec. 2016): 24. PDF File. ; "Around the Library." Library of Congress Magazine 6.1 (Jan./Feb. 2017): 24. PDF File. ; Maughan, Shannon. "PW Talks with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden." Publishers Weekly 16 Dec. 2016. Web. 14 Jan. 2017. ; Cox, Ana Marie. "Carla Hayden Thinks Libraries Are a Key to Freedom." New York Times Magazine 22 Jan. 2016: MM66. Print. ; Joiner, Lottie L. "The Accidental Librarian: Carla Hayden is the First Woman and First African American to Head the Library of Congress." Crisis 123.4 (Fall 2016): 22-25. Print. ; "Obama to Nominate Hayden as Librarian of Congress." American Libraries 47.5 (May 2016): 10. Print. ; Larson, Sarah. "The Librarian Congress and the Greatness of Humility: The Values of Dr. Carla Hayden, the First Woman and the First of Color in the Position, Can Be Seen in Every Aspect of the Institution She Runs." The New Yorker 19 Feb. 2017. Web. 23. Feb. 2017. ; "Dr. Carla Hayden to Kick Off Spectrum 20th Anniversary Celebration at ALA Annual Conference." ALA News 20 Mar. 2017. Web. 26 Mar. 2017.




Thursday, April 28, 2016

Dharathula Millender: Librarian, Author, and Historian -- One of Indiana's Own

Dharathula “Dolly” Hood Millender (1920-2015), a librarian, author, and historian, was born on February 4, 1920 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Her parents were Orestes Hood and Daisy Eslick Hood. 

Ms. Millender attended Indiana State Teacher’s College (now Indiana State University) in Terre Haute, Indiana, receiving her undergraduate degree in 1941. She pursued her library science education at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, graduating in 1969 with a Masters of Science in Educational Media. In addition, Ms. Millender was a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) sorority and was the wife of Justyn Millender.

Throughout her career, Ms. Millender served as a librarian in various libraries across the country -- working in Maryland, South Carolina, and Washington, D.C. (at the Library of Congress). From 1960 until 1978, she was a school librarian at Pulaski Junior High School in Gary, Indiana; and was a member of the Northwest Division of the Indiana State Teachers Association’s Library Section. In addition, she was a member of the Gary Public Library Board and was Gary’s first elected Councilwoman-at-Large.

As a historian and author, Mrs. Millender once served as the Chief Executive Officer for the Gary Historical and Cultural Society, and wrote several books on African American history for children, educators, and adults:

Crispus Attucks, Boy of Valor. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1965. Print.

Real Negroes, Honest Settings: Children's and Young People's Books About Negro Life and History. Chicago: American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO, 1967. Print.

"Through a Glass Darkly." School Library Journal 15 (Dec. 1967): 29-34. Print.

Yesterday in Gary: A Brief History of the Negro in Gary. Gary, Ind.: D. Millender, 1967. Print.

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Boy with a Dream. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1969. Print.

Louis Armstrong: Young Music Maker. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1972. Print.

Crispus Attucks, Black Leader of Colonial Patriots. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1982. Print.

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Young Man with a Dream. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1983. Print.

“Through A Glass Darkly (Excerpt).” The Black American in Books for Children: Readings in Racism. Ed. MacCann, Donnarae and Gloria Woodard. Metuchen, N.J: Scarecrow Press, 1985. Print.

Millender, Naomi, Bettye Turner, Dharathula H. Millender, and Barbara Polk. The Black History Resource Manual of Classroom Activities: The Cultural Linguistic Approach. Chicago: Cultural Linguistic Approach to Education, 1989. Print.

Gary's Central Business Community. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2003. Print.


On Tuesday, February 2, 2010, U.S. Representative Peter J. Visclosky of Indiana honored Ms. Millender on celebrating her 90th birthday (February 4th) and her lifework. In April 2011, the Indiana University-Northwest Chapter of the Neal-Marshall Alumni Club  presented Ms. Millender with the Legacy of Leadership Award.

Ms. Millender passed away at the age of 95 on December 25, 2015 in Gary, Indiana.



In 2012, I compiled a bibliography on Ms. Millender:


Fenton, Michele T. A Bibliography of Books by Author and Librarian Dharathula Millender: With a Brief Biography of Her Life. Indianapolis, Ind.: Little Known Black Librarian Facts, 2012. Print.


Update 05/10/2016:

See related posts: Etka Braboy Gaskin and the Gary Public Library (Gary, Indiana); and Bernice Appleton Wilder: First African American Director of the Gary Public Library (Gary, Indiana).

Sources: “May We Introduce Mrs. Dharathula Millender.” Gary Public Library Bulletin 1973 Jan.: 3. Print. ; “Officers and Committees of Indiana Library Organizations, 1971-1972.” Library Occurrent 24.1 (1972): 20. Print. ; Visclosky, Peter J. “Dolly Millender.” Congressional Record 156.15 (2010): E125-E126. Print. ; Millender, Dharathula H. "Through A Glass Darkly." School Library Journal 15 (1967): 29-34. Print. ; “It’s No Military Secret!” Indianapolis Recorder 1945 Sept. 15: 3. Print. ; “City Observes Crispus Attucks Day in Ceremonies on Circle.” Indianapolis Recorder 1968 Mar. 9: 15. Print. ; Rogers, Clema V. “Eastside News.” Indianapolis Recorder 1979 Jan. 20: 4. Print. ; Grant, George, comp. “Millender, Dharathula (Dolly).” The Directory of Ethnic Professionals in LIS. Winter Park: Four-G Publishers, 1991. 154. Print. ; Wilson, Rose Ann. “Dolly Millender Inspires M.I.S. Students.” Northwest Indiana Times 2012 Apr. 26:n.pag. Web. 2012 Nov. 11. ; Banas, Emily and Charles Shield. “IU Northwest Neal Marshall Club Recognizes 2011 Award Recipients: Student and Community-Centered Service Central to Awardees.” Indiana University Northwest News 2011 Apr. 26:n.pag. Web. 2012 Nov. 11 ; Fenton, Michele T. A Bibliography of Books by Author and Librarian Dharathula Millender: With a Brief Biography of Her Life. Indianapolis, Ind.: Little Known Black Librarian Facts, 2012. Print. ; Davich, Jerry. "Gary Loses Its Beloved Historian on Christmas Day." Chicago Tribune 2015 Dec. 27: n.pag. Web. 2016 Apr. 28.

Saturday, January 30, 2016

The Carnegie Library Roseau (Roseau, Dominica)

In 1904, Sir Henry Hesketh Bell (1864-1952) reached out to philanthropist Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919)  in an effort to persuade him to give a grant for the construction of a public library on the Caribbean island of DominicaCarnegie agreed to provide the grant and in 1905 gave £1,500 for the library's construction. The city of Roseau, the capital of Dominica, was chosen as the library's location. The architecture of the library was managed by Bell and on May 11, 1907 the library was opened to the public. 

Before the building of the Carnegie Library in Roseau,  there were earlier efforts to bring library services to the island of Dominica. In 1821, Dr. Jean Baptiste Louis founded the Literacy Society. Seven years later,  the Roseau Juvenile Literacy Association was established. Other efforts included:


The Dominica Public Circulating Library  (1832).

The Dominica Reading Room and Library (1847).
The Young Men's Literary Association (1849).

The library is still in operation and is now known as the Roseau Public Library. In December 2015, a tribute to the Roseau Public Library was posted to YouTube:


A Tribute to Roseau Public Library

Update 2/07/2016:

See also:  The Carnegie Free Library of Barbados (Bridgetown, Barbados), the Carnegie Free Library of St. Lucia (Castries, St. Lucia), and the Carnegie Free Library of San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago (San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago).


Sources: Boromé, Joseph A. "Origin and Growth of the Public Libraries of Dominica." Journal of Library History 5.3 (1970): 200-236. Print. ; Jordan, Alma. "Public Libraries in the British Caribbean 1." The Library Quarterly 35.2 (1964): 143-162. Print.  ; Hinds, Beverly. Historical Overview of Public Library Development in the English-Speaking Caribbean. [San Juan, PR]: IFLA, 2011. 1, 3-4, 6, 8. PDF File. ; Whitford, Gwenith M. "West Indian Murder Mystery Donated to Roseau Public Library in Dominica." Ti Domnik Tales. 23 July 2012. Web. 30 Jan. 2016. ; "State of the Art Library for Dominica." Dominica News Online. 14 May 2013. Web. 30 Jan. 2016. ; "Carnegie Library, Roseau, Dominica." Waymarking.com. 31 Aug. 2008. Web. 30 Jan. 2016; "A Tribute to Roseau Public Library." Dominica Library and Information Service. YouTube. 02 Dec. 2015. Web. 30 Jan. 2016. ; "Cambridge University Library: Royal Commonwealth Society Library, Sir Henry Hesketh Bell Collection, Y3011C-N." Cambridge University Library. Janus, n.d. Web. 30 Jan. 2016. ; "Andrew Carnegie." Biography.com. A&E Television Networks, LLC, 2016. Web. 30 Jan. 2016.

Saturday, August 1, 2015

The Carnegie Free Library of St. Lucia (Castries, St. Lucia)

Located in Castries, St. Lucia, the Carnegie Free Library of St. Lucia was one of six libraries in the Caribbean built with Carnegie funds. Plans for a library in St. Lucia were discussed in 1909. Seven years later, in May 1916, philanthropist and businessman Andrew Carnegie donated  £2,500 (equivalent to $12,500 in U.S. currency at that time) for the library's construction. Land on which to build the library was purchased for £500 (at that time was about $2,500 in U.S. currency).

Construction of the library didn't began until May 1923 . The delay was due to disagreement between town officials on the library's location and the library's design.  The Carnegie Free Library of St. Lucia's construction was finished in June 1924. A grand opening ceremony for the library was held on December 1, 1924.

In 1948, a fire spread through Castries, and the library was one of several buildings  in the town that were damaged.  Approximately, 20,000 volumes in the library's collection were destroyed. Afterwards, the Carnegie Free Library of St. Lucia was rebuilt, and in 1958, its name was changed to the Central Library of St. Lucia.

On November 25, 2014, Larry T. Nix, blogger for the "Library History Buff Blog", did a post about the St. Lucia Library's appearance on a postcard and the library's history. You can view his post here:

"St. Lucia's Carnegie Library on Carnegie's Birthday" by Larry T. Nix
http://libraryhistorybuff.blogspot.com/2014/11/st-lucias-carnegie-library-on-carnegies.html

Update 8/05/2015:

Related posts:  Carnegie Free Library of Barbados (Bridgetown, Barbados) and Carnegie Free Library of San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago.

Also, the Central Library of St. Lucia (formerly the Carnegie Free Library of St. Lucia) has a Facebook page:

Central Library of St. Lucia
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Central-Library-of-St-Lucia/131762740327635

Update 2/07/2016:

Related post: Carnegie Library Roseau (Roseau, Dominica)

Sources: Hinds, Beverly. Historical Overview of Public Library Development in the English-Speaking Caribbean. [San Juan, PR]: IFLA, 2011. 4. PDF File. ; Aimable, Anselma. "Did You Know: Controversy over Central Library." St. Lucia News Online, 28 Mar. 2014. Web. 27 July 2015. ; Nix, Larry T. "St. Lucia's Carnegie Library on Carnegie's Birthday." Library History Buff Blog, 25 Nov. 2014. Web. 27 July 2015.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Poets and Libraries: Countee Cullen Visits the Indianapolis Public Library, 1927

Countee Cullen (1903-1946), a graduate of New York University and Harvard University, was a renowned African American poet, author, and playwright who achieved fame during the Harlem Renaissance. He was also a Guggenheim Fellow, a member of Phi Beta Kappa, an instructor of French, English, and creative writing at Frederic Douglass High School in the Bronx, New York; and wrote a column for Opportunity Magazine called "The Dark Tower". Cullen's first wife, Nina Yolande Du Bois, was the daughter of W.E.B. Du Bois; his second wife was Ida Mae Robertson.


On Saturday, February 26, 1927, Countee Cullen made a visit to the Paul Laurence Dunbar Branch of the Indianapolis Public Library in Indianapolis, Indiana where a tea was held for him by the library's staff. Hallie Beachem Brooks (1907-1985), manager of the Dunbar Branch; and Lillian Haydon Childress Hall (1889-1958), head librarian at the Crispus Attucks Branch served as the program's hostesses. Other attendees present at the tea were Charles E. Rush, director of the Indianapolis Public Library; music teacher Lillian LeMon, singer Lucretia Mitchell, Ada Dodson, Lucille Armsted, Juanita Bobson, Dora Atkins, Murray Atkins, and Sophia Freeman. Attendees at the tea were treated to a poetry reading by Cullen.


Cullen had travelled to Indianapolis, Indiana at the invitation of the Senate Avenue YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association). The Senate Avenue YMCA was preparing its annual recital and wanted Cullen to give a poetry reading at the event. [Note: Founded in 1913, the Senate Avenue YMCA served the African American men and boys of Indianapolis. Madame C.J. Walker gave a gift of $1,000 to aide in the building's construction; Booker T. Washington attended the dedication ceremony].


The Senate Avenue YMCA's recital took place on Friday, February 25, 1927 at Caleb Mills Hall inside Shortridge High School. In addition to Countee Cullen, other performers at the recital included Walter M. Price, a baritone who studied under Oscar Seagel; and the Reginald DuValle Orchestra, also known as the "Ten Blackbirds" (the group's leader, Reginald DuValle worked with musician Hoagy Carmichael and was an alumni of Shortridge High School; DuValle also performed at the 1927 grand opening of the Madame Walker Theatre). [Note: YouTube has a video of Reginald DuValle's son, Reginald Jr. speaking about his father's work with Hoagy Carmichael: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-5ppnee7eU ].


Lillian Haydon Childress Hall of the Indianapolis Public Library; Lula Hoss of the All Souls Unitarian Church; Homer Borst of the Indianapolis Community Fund; the Kirshbaum Center; the  Kautz Stationary Company; the Senate Avenue YMCA Committee of Management along with Marimon Hansberry, Ada Dodson, Phyllis Waters, Daisy Payne, J.B. Coleman, J.K. Lilly, and Sue Artis successfully combined their efforts in selling as many tickets as possible to this historic event. [Note: Sue Artis was the wife of Lionel F. Artis. Lionel F. Artis was the assistant secretary of the Senate Avenue YMCA, served as an officer of the Indianapolis branch of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), was a member of Kappa Alpha Psi, served on the board of the Urban League of Indianapolis, worked with the Boy Scouts, and was a graduate of Indiana University and the University of Chicago. His papers are housed at the Indiana Historical Society in Indianapolis, Indiana]


Before leaving town, Countee Cullen visited his friend Hale A. Woodruff (1900-1980), an African American painter and muralist famous for the murals "Amistad Mutiny". Woodruff studied under artist Diego Rivera (his wife was painter Frida Kahlo), attended the John Herron School of Art in Indianapolis (now the Herron School of Art and Design), and once worked for the Senate Avenue YMCA. In addition, he taught art at Atlanta University (now Clark-Atlanta University and New York University. Mr. Woodruff passed away in 1980 at the age of 80.


Sources: "Negro Poet to Read." Indianapolis News 12 Feb. 1927: 8. Print. ; "Gives Tea for Mr. Cullen." Indianapolis Recorder 5 Mar. 1927: 5 Print. ; Thompson, Aaron Belford. "Welcome to Countee Cullen." Indianapolis Recorder 26 Feb. 1927: 2. Print. ; "Cullen, Price, DuValle Orchestra Recital Promise Treat at Caleb Mills Hall." Indianapolis Recorder 19 Feb. 1927: 5. Print. ; "Author is to Speak at Monster Meeting." Indianapolis News 5 Feb 1927: 3 Print. ; Fenton, Michele T. "Stepping Out on Faith: Lillian Haydon Childress Hall, Pioneer Black Librarian." Indiana Libraries 33.1 (2014): 7. Print. ; Molesworth, Charles. And Bid Him Sing: A Biography of Countee Cullen. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2012. 162-163. Print. ; "Countee Cullen." Bio. A&E Television Networks, 2015. Web. 17 May 2015. ; "Wavelengths - Bits of Static." Indianapolis News 10 Feb. 1927: 16. Print. ; Williams, David Leander. Indianapolis Jazz: The Masters, Legends, and Legacy of Indiana Avenue. Charleston, SC: History Press, 2014. 27-29. Print. ; Bolden, C. Nickerson. Indiana Avenue: Entertainment Boulevard. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse, 2009. Print. ; Bundles, A'Lelia. Madam Walker Theatre Center: An Indianapolis Treasure. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2013. Print. ; Warren, Stanley. "The Monster Meetings at the Negro YMCA in Indianapolis." Indiana Magazine of History 91.1 (1995): 57-80. Print. ; Burlock, Melissa Grace. "The Battle Over a Black YMCA and Its Inner-City Community: The Fall Creek Parkway YMCA As a Lens on Indianapolis' Urban Revitalization and School Desegregation, 1959-2003." MA thesis. Indiana University, 2014. PDF file. ; Jennings, Corrine. "Hale Woodruff: African-American Metaphor, Myth, and Allegory." A Shared Heritage: Art by Four African Americans. Ed. William E. Taylor and Harriet G. Warkel. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 1996. 78. Print. ; Dunkley, Tina. "Hale Woodruff (1900-1980)." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 6 Dec. 2013. Web. 24 May 2015. ; Yoon, Christina Jin. "Woodruff, Hale Aspacio (1900-1980)." BlackPast. BlackPast.org, n.d. Web. 24 May 2015. ; Davis, Donald F. "Hale Woodruff of Atlanta: Molder of Black Artists." Journal of Negro History 69.3-4 (1984):147-154. Print. ; Taylor, William E. "Woodruff, Hale Aspacio (Aug. 6, 1900-Sept. 6, 1980)." Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Eds. David J. Bodenhamer and Roger G. Barrows. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 1994. 1452. Print.; Taylor, William E. "Hardrick, John Wesley (1891-Oct. 18, 1968)." Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Eds. David J. Bodenhamer and Roger G. Barrows. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 1994. 660. Print. ; Pierce, Richard. "Little Progress 'Happens'": Faburn E. DeFrantz and the Indianapolis Senate Avenue YMCA." Indiana Magazine of History 108.2 (2012): 98-103. Print. ; Warren, Stanley. Senate Avenue YMCA: For African American Men and Boys, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1913-1959. Indianapolis: Donning, 2006. Print. ; "Lionel F. Artis Eulogized as Outstanding Leader in the Indianapolis Community." Indianapolis Recorder 11 Sept. 1971: 1, 15. Print. ; "Lionel Artis (Photo)." Indianapolis Recorder 4 Sept. 1971:1. Print. ; "Local Branch of N.A.A.C.P. Elects Officers." Indianapolis Recorder 7 Apr. 1928: 2. Print. ; "Governor Speaks to Y.M.C.A. Men." Indianapolis Recorder 20 Feb. 1926: 1. Print. ; "St. Philip's Episcopal Church." Indianapolis Recorder 18 Sept. 1915: 4. Print. ; "Indianapolis Business Association." Indianapolis Recorder 12 Mar. 1927: 3. Print. ; "Local N.A.A.C.P. Selects Committee for Conference." Indianapolis Recorder 12 Mar. 1927: 2. Print. ; "Y.M.C.A. Notes." Indianapolis Recorder 18 Sept. 1915: 4. Print. ; "Y.M.C.A." Indianapolis Recorder 15 Sept. 1911: 2. Print. ; "Twelfth Annual Lenton Tea to Be Given By Members of St. Monica's Guild." Indianapolis Recorder 6 Mar. 1937: 5. Print. ; "Simpson M.E. Will Observe Anniversary." Indianapolis Recorder 5 Nov. 1932: 3. Print. ; "Guidance Program for H.S. Seniors." Indianapolis Recorder 21 May 1932: 6. Print. ; "Kappas Will Give Prom Soon." Indianapolis Recorder 21 May 1932: 6. Print. ; "Lockefield Rents on Same Level as Slum Houses." Indianapolis Recorder 15 May 1937: 1.Print. ; Skeleton, Robert E. "Donations Received for Drum and Bugle Corps." Indianapolis Recorder 6 Mar. 1936. 5. Print.