Thursday, July 26, 2012

African American State Law Librarians of West Virginia

From 1900-1906, Samuel W. Starks was the state law librarian for the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.

Sources: Jordan, Casper Leroy and E.J. Josey. "A Chronology of Events in Black Librarianship." Handbook of Black Librarianship. Ed. E.J. Josey and Marva L. DeLoach. 2nd ed. Lanham: Scarecrow, 2000. 4. Print. ; "Western Colored School." National Historic Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Section 8. Washington: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, 1993. 5. Pdf. West Virginia Culture, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2010. ; Posey, Thomas E. The Negro Citizen of West Virginia. Institute: West Virginia State College, 1934. 39, 43, 47, 60. Print. ; Josey, E.J. "The Role of the Black Library and Information Professional in the Information Society: Myths and Realities." Educating Black Librarians: Papers from the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the School of Library and Information Sciences, North Carolina Central University. Ed. Benjamin F. Speller, Jr. Jefferson: McFarland, 1991. 52. Print.

John C. Gilmer was the state law librarian of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, 1906-1913.

Sources: Posey, Thomas E. The Negro Citizen of West Virginia. Institute: West Virginia State College, 1934. 47, 50, 60. Print. ; The West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia. Vol. 9. Richwood: Comstock, 1976. 1841. Print.

Leroy Oliver Wilson was the state law librarian, 1914-1917.

Sources: "Western Colored School." National Historic Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Section 8. Washington: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, 1993. 3-5. Pdf. West Virginia Culture, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2010. ; Posey, Thomas E. The Negro Citizen of West Virginia. Institute: West Virginia State College, 1934. 43, 47. Print.

J. Arthur Jackson was the state law librarian, 1921-1965.

Sources: "Ex-High Court Librarian, Jackson, Dies at 93." Charleston Gazette 4 Nov. 1978: n.pag. West Virginia Archives & History. Web. 23 October 2010. ; Jordan, Casper Leroy and E.J. Josey. "A Chronology of Events in Black Librarianship." Handbook of Black Librarianship. Ed. E.J. Josey and Marva DeLoach. 2nd ed. Lanham: Scarecrow, 2000. 6. Print. ; Posey, Thomas E. The Negro Citizen of West Virginia. Institute: West Virginia State College, 1934. 47, 49. Print.

                                                                                                                             

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Dr. Lucille Cole Thomas: The First and Only African American President of the New York Library Association (NYLA)

*Submitted by Dr. Lucille Cole Thomas


Lucille Cole Thomas is the first and only African American president of the New York Library Association (1977-1978), and the first African American to serve as president of the School Library Media Section (SLMS) (1973-1974) of the New York Library Association (NYLA). In addition, she was the first African American elected president of the New York City School Librarians Association (1970-1972) and The New York Library Club (1977-1978). Dr. Thomas received her library science degree from Columbia University (1957), where she was active as president of the alumni association. She is also a graduate of New York University and Bennett College.


A member of the American Library Association (ALA) since 1965, Thomas has served on the ALA Council and Executive Board. In 2003, at the Annual ALA Conference in Toronto, she was awarded ALA's highest honor, "Honorary Member." Thomas' international library service includes president of the International Association of School Librarianship (IASL) (1989-1994), NGO Representative of International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) to the United Nations, and the chair of several committees.

In 1982, she was one of five educators from the United States to participate in the French Ministry Cultural Exchange Program. One week was spent in Paris, France visiting cultural institutions and interacting with officials. In 1990, the American Library Association (ALA) and the International  Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) selected Thomas as the only librarian representative to the "World Conference on Education" in Jomtien, Thailand. Among the 2,000 delegates from 150 countries participants, Thomas represented all libraries. Her report was included in the final conference report. In 2002, she testified before the United States House of Representatives' Committee on Education and the Workforce during its reauthorization hearing on the Museum and Library Service Act (click here to view transcript of hearing).

In 1974, Dr. Thomas founded "School Library Media Day (NYLA)", and in 1985, "School Library Media Month (AASL/ALA)". From 1993 to the present, Thomas serves as Trustee of the Brooklyn Public Library (NY), an appointment by the mayor of the city of New York. During that time she was elected president for three years. The Queen College School of Library and Information Studies (CUNY) named an award, the Lucille Thomas Library Award, in her honor in 2010.

Sources:

Thomas, Lucille Cole. "Public Libraries in the 21st Century: Challenges and Solutions." The 21st Century Black Librarian in America: Issues and Challenges. Ed. Andrew P. Jackson, Julius C. Jefferson, and Akilah S. Nosakhere. Lanham: Scarecrow, 2012. 79-84. Print.


"Lucille C. Thomas: She Helps Make Librarians 'Master Builders and Creators'."American Libraries 32.3-4 (1978): 83. Print.


"Lucille C. Thomas Named 2007 Freedom to Read Foundation Roll of Honor Award Recipient." Freedom to Read Foundation. American Library Association, 8 June 2007. Web. 11 July 2012.
[http://www.ala.org/news/news/pressreleases2007/june2007/thomasfreedomtoreadaward ]


"Minutes." IFLA Section on Library Services to Multicultural Populations. IFLA, 6 July 2012. Web. 11 July 2012.
[Minutes from the 2001 Meeting in Boston and the 2001 Midwinter Meeting in Granada can be accessed: http://www.ifla.org/en/mcultp/minutes ]


Queens College School of Library and Information Studies Student Handbook, Fall 2010. New York: Queens College School of Library and Information Studies, 2010. 22.Print.
[See: http://www.Qcpages.qc/Cuny.edu/GSLIS/handbooks/Student_Handbook.doc ]


Equipping Museums and Libraries for the 21st Century: Hearing before the Subcommittee in Select Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, Second Session, Hearing Held in Washington, DC, February 14, 2002. Washington: U.S. G.P.O., 2002. Print.
[Also available: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-107hhrg81193/pdf/CHRG-107hhrg81193.pdf ]


Thomas, Lucille C. "School Libraries in the New York City Schools." Bookmark 50.1 (1991). Print.  
[This special issue of Bookmark is also called School Library Media Program Connections for Learning ; Abstract found here: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/detail?accno=ED346857 ]


Dawson, Alma. "Celebrating African American Librarians and Libraries." Library Trends 49.1 (2000): 59. Print.
[Also available at: http://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/8328/librarytrendsv49ild-opt.pdf?s ]


"Breaking New Ground: Bedford Library Reopens & Ninth Annual Gala Event." Brooklyn Public Library. Brooklyn Public Library,14 Nov. 2005.Web. 12 July 2012.
[http://www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/media/press/breaking-new-ground-bedford-library-reopens-ninth-annual-gala-event ]


"Annual Report 2009 Brooklyn Public Library." Brooklyn Public Library. Brooklyn Public Library, 2010. Web. 12 July 2012.
[ http://www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/sites/default/files/files/ar09.pdf ]


Thomas, Lucille C. "World Literacy and the Role of Libraries." IFLA Journal 19.2 (1993): 162-167. Print.


Nottingham, Sharon. "Lucille Thomas: A Legend from Brooklyn to the World." The Bulletin of the New York Library Association 44.3 (1996): 15-16. Print.


Thomas, Lucille. Chapter in What Black Librarians are Saying. Ed. E.J. Josey. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1972.


Thomas, Lucille. "Ethical Considerations in an Age of Technology." School Library Media Annual, 1985. Ed.Shirley Aaron and Pat Scales. Littleton: Libraries Unlimited, 1985. 423-431. Print.


Staino, Rocco. "Lucille Thomas on the 25th Anniversary of School Library Media Month." School Library Journal. School Library Journal, 7 Apr. 2010. Web. 11 July 2012. [http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6724833.html]

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Virginia Lacy Jones: Second African American to Earn PhD in Library Science

Virginia Lacy Jones (1912-1984), a 1936 graduate of the Hampton Institute Library School, was the second dean of the library school at Atlanta University (now Clark-Atlanta University). She was also the second African American to earn a Ph.D. in library science, which she earned from the University of Chicago. For two years, Ms. Jones served as an editorial consultant for Library Journal.  Before coming to Atlanta University, Ms. Jones was a librarian at the Louisville Municipal College for Negroes (now Simmons College of Kentucky), Hampton Institute (now Hampton University), and Prairie View State College (now Prairie View A&M University).  

Update 07/07/2012:
Eliza Atkins Gleason was the first African American to earn a Ph.D. in library science and was the first dean of the library school at Atlanta University (now Clark-Atlanta University). Like Jones, Gleason earned her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago.

See related posts: Librarian Education: Eliza Atkins Gleason, First African American to Earn PhD in Library Science and Annette Hoage Phinazee: Dean, Professor, Author, and Librarian.

Sources: Jones, Virginia Lacy. "A Dean's Career." The Black Librarian in America. Ed. E.J. Josey. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1970. 19-42. Print. ; "Top Negro Librarians Air Views on Library Segregation." Jet 20.5 (1961): 24-25. Print. ; Jordan, Casper and E.J. Josey. "A Chronology of Events in Black Librarianship." Handbook of Black Librarianship. Ed. E.J. Josey and Marva L. DeLoach. 2nd ed. Lanham: Scarecrow, 2000. 7. Print. ; Woodson, Almeta Gould. "Fifty Years of Service: A Chronological History of the School of Library Service Atlanta University, 1941-1979; the School of Library and Information Studies Atlanta University, 1979-1989; the School of Library and Information Studies, Clark Atlanta University, 1989-1991." Georgia Librarian 28.3 (1991): 71-77. Print. ; Totten, Herman L. "Southeastern Black Educators." The Black Librarian in the Southeast: Reminiscences, Activities, Challenges. Ed. Annette L. Phinazee. Durham: NCCU School of Library Science, 1980. 206. Print. ; Jordan, Casper Leroy. "The Multifaceted Life of Virginia Lacy Jones." The Black Librarian in America Revisited. Ed. E.J. Josey. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1994. 75-86. Print. ; McPheeters, Annie L. Library Service in Black and White: Some Personal Recollections, 1921-1980. Metuchen: Scarecrow, 1988. 9-10, 131. Print. ; "Atlanta University Center Exhibition Hall Named for Dr. Virginia Lacy Jones." Jet 68.16 (1985): 19. Print. ; "College and School News." Crisis 63.7 (1956): 436. Print. ; "College and School News." Crisis 50.11 (1943): 323. Print. ; "Segregation in Libraries." Crisis 68.6 (1961): 342-343. Print. ; "College and School News." Crisis 71.10 (1969): 701. Print. ; A Directory of Negro Graduates of Accredited Library Schools, 1900-1936. Washington: Columbia Civic Library Association, 1937. 15. Print. ; Josey, E.J. "Foreword." Educating Black Librarians: Papers from the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the School of Library and Information Sciences, North Carolina Central University. Ed. Benjamin F. Speller, Jr. Jefferson: McFarland, 1991. xi. Print. ; "Receives Doctorate at University of Chicago." Indianapolis Recorder 6 Oct. 1945: 5. Print. ; Freightman, Connie Green. "Historically Black College Closes Its Library Studies Program." The Crisis 112.1 (2005): 10. Print.
                   
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